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Calcium channel blocker use and risk of Parkinson's disease§

Authors

  • Kelly Claire Simon ScD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    • Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Department of Nutrition, Bldg 2, 3rd floor, Boston, MA 02115
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  • Xiang Gao MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Honglei Chen MD, PhD,

    1. Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA
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  • Michael A. Schwarzschild MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Alberto Ascherio MD, DrPH

    1. Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    3. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

  • Potential conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

  • §

    Financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

Abstract

We investigated whether the use of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) was associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in two large prospective cohorts: the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and Health Professionals' Follow-Up Study (HPFS). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the association between use of CCBs and risk of PD adjusting for potential confounders. We identified 514 incident cases of PD during follow-up. No association between baseline use of CCBs (RR = 1.18, 95% CI: 0.73–1.92), frequency of use or duration of use of CCBs and PD risk was observed (P > 0.2 for all). These findings do not support a role for CCBs in providing neuroprotection against development of PD. © 2010 Movement Disorder Society

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