CSF Aβ42 and tau in Parkinson's disease with cognitive impairment

Authors

  • Thomas J. Montine MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA
    • Department of Pathology, University of Washington; 300 9th Ave, Room 713B; Seattle, WA 98104
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    • Thomas J. Montine and Min Shi contributed equally to this work.

  • Min Shi MD,

    1. Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA
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    • Thomas J. Montine and Min Shi contributed equally to this work.

  • Joseph F. Quinn MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA
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  • Elaine R. Peskind MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA
    2. VA Northwest Network Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington, USA
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  • Suzanne Craft PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA
    2. Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington, USA
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  • Carmen Ginghina PhD,

    1. Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA
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  • Kathryn A. Chung MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA
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  • Hojoong Kim MD,

    1. Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA
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  • Douglas R. Galasko MD,

    1. Department of Neurosciences, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California, USA
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  • Joseph Jankovic MD,

    1. Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA
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  • Cyrus P. Zabetian MD, MS,

    1. Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA
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  • James B. Leverenz MD,

    1. VA Northwest Network Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA
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  • Jing Zhang MD, PhD

    1. Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA
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  • Potential conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that the CSF biomarker signature associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is present in a subset of individuals with Parkinson's disease and Dementia (PD-D) or with PD and Cognitive Impairment, Not Dementia (PD-CIND). We quantified CSF Aβ42, total tau (T-tau), and phospho-tau (P181-tau) using commercially available kits. Samples were from 345 individuals in seven groups (n): Controls ≤50 years (35), Controls >50 years (115), amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) (24), AD (49), PD (49), PD-CIND (62), and PD-D (11). We observed expected changes in AD or aMCI compared with age-matched or younger controls. CSF Aβ42 was reduced in PD-CIND (P < 0.05) and PD-D (P < 0.01), whereas average CSF T-tau and P181-tau were unchanged or decreased. One-third of PD-CIND and one-half of PD-D patients had the biomarker signature of AD. Abnormal metabolism of Aβ42 may be a common feature of PD-CIND and PD-D. © 2010 Movement Disorder Society

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