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Tremor—some controversial aspects

Authors

  • Niall P. Quinn MD,,

    Corresponding author
    1. Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
    • Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
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  • Susanne A. Schneider MD, PhD,,

    1. Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
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  • Petra Schwingenschuh MD,,

    1. Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
    2. Department of Neurology, Division of Special Neurology, Medical University Graz, Austria
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  • Kailash P. Bhatia MD, DM

    1. Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
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  • Potential conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

The commonest cause of pathological tremor is essential tremor (ET). However, it has proved difficult to identify genetic mutations causing ET, particularly because other causes of tremor continue to be misdiagnosed as ET. Whether subjects with dystonia or Parkinson's disease (PD) carry an increased genetic risk of developing ET, or vice versa, is controversial. In addition, the notion of a separate disorder of benign tremulous parkinsonism (BTP) has been debated. This article gives a selective viewpoint on some areas of uncertainty and controversy in tremor. © 2010 Movement Disorder Society

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