How well do caregivers detect mild cognitive change in Parkinson's disease?

Authors

  • Sharon L. Naismith,

    1. Parkinson's Disease Research Clinic, Brain & Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Marilia Pereira,

    1. Parkinson's Disease Research Clinic, Brain & Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia
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  • James M. Shine,

    1. Parkinson's Disease Research Clinic, Brain & Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Simon J.G. Lewis

    Corresponding author
    1. Parkinson's Disease Research Clinic, Brain & Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia
    • Parkinson's Disease Research Clinic, Brain & Mind Research Institute, 94 Mallett Street, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Potential conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

Using the Cambridge Behavior Inventory-Revised, this study evaluated the relationship between caregiver ratings of cognitive change and neuropsychological performance. In sixty-one nondemented patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD; mean age = 64.5 years, MMSE = 28.7), 62% met criteria for mild cognitive impairment. This group were rated as having more overall change as well as memory and behavior change. Caregiver ratings were related to poorer psychomotor speed, learning/memory, language, and executive functioning. The capacity for caregivers to rate mild cognitive change in PD may be useful to assist in early screening and intervention approaches. © 2010 Movement Disorder Society

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