The effect of drug treatment on neurogenesis in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Sean S. O'Sullivan PhD, MRCPI,

    Corresponding author
    1. Reta Lila Weston Institute of Neurological Studies, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    2. Queen Square Brain Bank for Neurological Disorders and Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    • Reta Lila Weston Institute of Neurological Studies, University College London, 1 Wakefield Street, London WC1N 1PJ, United Kingdom
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  • Mary Johnson,

    1. Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom
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  • David R. Williams PhD,

    1. Faculty of Medicine (Neuroscience), Monash University (Alfred Hospital Campus), Melbourne, Australia
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  • Tamas Revesz FRCPath,

    1. Queen Square Brain Bank for Neurological Disorders and Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
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  • Janice L. Holton FRCPath,

    1. Queen Square Brain Bank for Neurological Disorders and Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
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  • Andrew J. Lees MD,

    1. Reta Lila Weston Institute of Neurological Studies, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    2. Queen Square Brain Bank for Neurological Disorders and Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
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  • Elaine K. Perry PhD

    1. Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom
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  • Potential conflict of interest: The authors have no conflicts of interest and no financial disclosures to make.

Abstract

There has been recent interest in the possibility that impaired neurogenesis may contribute to the decline in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD). We have investigated the effects of commonly used treatments for PD on neural stem cell (NSC) activity in nondemented patients. Postmortem of brain tissue containing the subventricular zone (SVZ) and ependymal layer cells was obtained from 32 nondemented patients with PD. NSC activity was assessed by immunohistochemical staining for RNA-binding protein Musashi1. Regression analyses were then used to identify which clinical factors independently influenced NSC activity. Disease duration was negatively associated with SVZ Musashi1 staining, whereas lifetime levodopa was positively associated in this region. Our findings suggest a positive impact of chronic L-dopa use on the number of NSC in the SVZ of PD patients, which may have relevance for future studies on neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases. © 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

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