Novel mutations in SPG11 cause hereditary spastic paraplegia associated with early-onset levodopa-responsive Parkinsonism

Authors


  • Relevant conflict of interest/financial disclosures: Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of the article. This study was funded in part by research grants from the Italian Ministry of Health, Fondazione Telethon (GGP10121A) and an E-RARE grant from the European Union (EUROSPA network) to FMS.

Abstract

Background: Autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by spastic paraparesis, cognitive impairment, and peripheral neuropathy. The neuroradiologic hallmarks are thin corpus callosum and periventricular white matter changes. Mutations in the SPG11 gene have been identified to be a major cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and recently also proven to be responsible for juvenile parkinsonism associated with spastic paraplegia.

Methods: We describe one Italian autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum patient who unusually presented at onset, 16 years, with parkinsonism-like features, responsive to dopaminergic therapy. Then the clinical picture evolved and became more complex. A brain magnetic resonance imaging scan showed thin corpus callosum and hyperintense T2-weighted lesions in periventricular regions, and the 123I-ioflupane single-photon emission coupled tomography was abnormal.

Results: Genetic analysis detected two novel mutations, a c.3664insT variant in compound heterozygosity with a c.6331insG mutation, in SPG11.

Discussion: This case confirms the high genetic and clinical heterogeneity associated with SPG11 mutations. It also offers further evidence that parkinsonism may initiate autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and that parkinsonian symptoms can have variable dopaminergic response in these patients. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society

Ancillary