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Blind randomized controlled study of the efficacy of cognitive training in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Anna Prats París MS, PhDc,

    1. Unitat de Parkinson i Trastorns del Moviment, Centro Médico Teknon. Barcelona, Spain
    2. Universidad Autònoma de Barcelona, Dpto. Biología Celular, Fisiología e Inmunología, Instituto de Neurociencias (INc), Barcelona, Spain
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    • Anna Prats París and Heidi Guerra Saleta contributed equally to this work.

  • Heidi Guerra Saleta PhDc,

    1. Universidad de Salamanca, Facultad de Psicología, Dpto. Psicología Básica, Psicobiología y Metodología. Salamanca, Spain
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    • Anna Prats París and Heidi Guerra Saleta contributed equally to this work.

  • Maria de la Cruz Crespo Maraver PhDc,

    1. Unitat de Parkinson i Trastorns del Moviment, Centro Médico Teknon. Barcelona, Spain
    2. Divisió de Salut Mental, Fundació Althaia, Manresa, Spain
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  • Emmanuel Silvestre PhD,

    1. Silvestre Hispanic Market Research & Services, Rocky Hill, Connecticut, USA
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  • Maite Garolera Freixa PhD,

    1. Consorci Sanitari de Terrasa Hospital, Terrasa, Spain
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  • Cristina Petit Torrellas BA,

    1. Unitat de Parkinson i Trastorns del Moviment, Centro Médico Teknon. Barcelona, Spain
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  • Silvia Alonso Pont BA,

    1. Unitat de Parkinson i Trastorns del Moviment, Centro Médico Teknon. Barcelona, Spain
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  • Marc Fabra Nadal MS,

    1. Unitat de Parkinson i Trastorns del Moviment, Centro Médico Teknon. Barcelona, Spain
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  • Sheila Alcaine Garcia BA,

    1. Unitat de Parkinson i Trastorns del Moviment, Centro Médico Teknon. Barcelona, Spain
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  • Maria Victoria Perea Bartolomé MD,

    1. Universidad de Salamanca, Facultad de Psicología, Dpto. Psicología Básica, Psicobiología y Metodología. Salamanca, Spain
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  • Valentina Ladera Fernández PhD,

    1. Universidad de Salamanca, Facultad de Psicología, Dpto. Psicología Básica, Psicobiología y Metodología. Salamanca, Spain
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  • Àngels Rusiñol Bayés MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Unitat de Parkinson i Trastorns del Moviment, Centro Médico Teknon. Barcelona, Spain
    • Unidad de Parkinson y Trastornos del Movimiento, Centro Médico Teknon, Pso. Bonanova 26, Barcelona, Spain. 08022

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  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

    Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of a cognitive training program on cognitive performance and quality of life in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients. Participants who met UK Brain Bank diagnosis criteria for Parkinson's disease, with I–III Hoehn & Yahr, aged 50–80, and nondemented (Mini-Mental State Examination ≥ 23) were recruited. Patient's cognitive performance and functional and quality-of-life measures were assessed with standardized neuropsychological tests and scales at baseline and after 4 weeks. Subjects were randomly and blindly allocated by age and premorbid intelligence (Vocabulary, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III) into 2 groups: an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group received 4 weeks of 3 weekly 45-minute sessions using multimedia software and paper-and-pencil cognitive exercises, and the control group received speech therapy. A total of 28 patients were analyzed. Compared with the control group participants (n = 12), the experimental group participants (n = 16) demonstrated improved performance in tests of attention, information processing speed, memory, visuospatial and visuoconstructive abilities, semantic verbal fluency, and executive functions. There were no observable benefits in self-reported quality of life or cognitive difficulties in activities of daily living. We concluded that intensive cognitive training may be a useful tool in the management of cognitive functions in Parkinson's disease. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society

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