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Tongue control for swallowing in Parkinson's disease: Effects of age, rate, and stimulus consistency§

Authors

  • Pascal H.H.M. Van Lieshout PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    3. Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    4. Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • University of Toronto, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Oral Dynamics Lab (ODL), 500 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1V7, Canada
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  • Catriona M. Steele PhD,

    1. Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    3. Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    4. Bloorview Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    5. Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • Anthony E. Lang MD

    1. Toronto Western Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • This research was supported by funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (Grant 63271) and in part from the Canada Research Chairs Program. Support also came from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, which receives funding under the Provincial Rehabilitation Research Program from the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care in Ontario.

  • §

    Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Background:

Patients with Parkinson's disease often suffer from swallowing problems, especially at more advanced stages of the disease. Efficient swallows require well-coordinated tongue movements during bolus flow, but little is known about such movements in Parkinson's disease.

Methods:

The current study presents data on tongue movements for patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease (n = 10), age-matched adults (n = 13), and younger healthy adults (n = 15).

Results:

Participants with Parkinson's disease showed smaller and more variable movements in the horizontal movement plane, indicating that tongue movements are affected in early stages of Parkinson's disease.

Conclusions:

The small and more variable movements in the horizontal plane of Patients with Parkinson's disease may pose challenges for swallowing liquids efficiently and safely. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society

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