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Milestones in magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial sonography of movement disorders

Authors

  • Daniela Berg MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurodegeneration, Hertie-Institute of Clinical Brain Research and German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
    • Department of Neurodegeneration, Hertie-Institute of Clinical Brain Research and German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Hoppe-Seyler-Str, 3, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
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  • Jonathan D. Steinberger MD,

    1. Department of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
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  • C. Warren Olanow MD,

    1. Department of Neurology. and Neuroscience, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
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  • Thomas P. Naidich MD,

    1. Department of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
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  • Tarek A. Yousry MD

    1. Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, University College London, United Kingdom
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum: Milestones in magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial sonography of movement disorders Volume 26, Issue 7, 1372, Article first published online: 20 June 2011

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

    Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Twenty-five years ago, when this journal was initiated, imaging of movement disorders was in its infancy. Since that time, magnetic resonance imaging has become a standard technique that is routinely performed in patients with movement disorders in order to exclude secondary causes and in some instances to provide specific information that aids in making the diagnosis of a neurodegenerative condition. Transcranial sonography is a more recent advance and is now widely employed to aid in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and possibly in detecting individuals in the premotor phases of the disease. Investigations are currently under way to evaluate the value of this technique in other movement disorders. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society

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