Pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease—a review of the literature

Authors

  • Atbin Djamshidian MD,

    1. Department of Molecular Neuroscience and Reta Lila Weston Institute for Neurological Studies, University of London, London, United Kingdom
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  • Francisco Cardoso MD, PhD,

    1. Movement Disorders Group, Neurology Service, Department of Internal Medicine, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Minas Gerais, Brazil
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  • Donald Grosset MD, FRCP,

    1. Institute of Neurological Sciences, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom
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  • Henrietta Bowden-Jones MD,

    1. CNWL National Problem Gambling Clinic, London, United Kingdom
    2. Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
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  • Andrew J. Lees MD, FRCP

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Molecular Neuroscience and Reta Lila Weston Institute for Neurological Studies, University of London, London, United Kingdom
    • Reta Lila Weston Institute of Neurological Studies, UCL Institute of Neurology, 1 Wakefield St., London, WC1N 1PJ, UK
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  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

The prevalence of pathological gambling is 3.4% to 6% in treated Parkinson's disease, which is higher than the background population rate. In this review we discuss current evidence to indicate that dopamine agonists are much more likely to trigger this behavior than either L-dopa or selective monoamine oxidase B inhibitor monotherapy. New insights from recent behavioral and functional imaging studies and possible treatment approaches are also covered. A PubMed literature search using the terms “gambling” and “Parkinson's disease,” “impulse control disorder,” “impulsive compulsive behaviour,” “dopamine agonist,” of individual dopamine agonists, and of ongoing drug trials, using http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, was carried out for the period up to January 2011. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society

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