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Keywords:

  • mild cognitive impairment;
  • Parkinson's disease;
  • systematic review

Abstract

There is controversy regarding the definition and characteristics of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease. The Movement Disorder Society commissioned a Task Force to critically evaluate the literature and determine the frequency and characteristics of Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment and its association with dementia. A comprehensive PubMed literature review was conducted using systematic inclusion and exclusion criteria. A mean of 26.7% (range, 18.9%–38.2%) of nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease have mild cognitive impairment. The frequency of Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment increases with age, disease duration, and disease severity. Impairments occur in a range of cognitive domains, but single domain impairment is more common than multiple domain impairment, and within single domain impairment, nonamnestic is more common than amnestic impairment. A high proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment progress to dementia in a relatively short period of time. The primary conclusions of the Task Force are that: (1) Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment is common, (2) there is significant heterogeneity within Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment in the number and types of cognitive domain impairments, (3) Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment appears to place patients at risk of progressing to dementia, and (4) formal diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment are needed. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society