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MDS task force on mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: Critical review of PD-MCI

Authors

  • Irene Litvan MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, and Movement Disorders Program, Frazier Rehab Neuroscience Institute, Louisville, Kentucky, USA
    • Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 220 Abraham Flexner Way, Ste. 1503, Louisville, KY 40241, USA
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  • Dag Aarsland MD, PhD,

    1. Centre for Age-Related Medicine, Stavanger University Hospital and Akershus University Hospital/University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
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  • Charles H. Adler MD,

    1. Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA
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  • Jennifer G. Goldman MD, MS,

    1. Section of Parkinson Disease and Movement Disorders, Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Jaime Kulisevsky MD, PhD,

    1. Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Department, Sant Pau Hospital and Institute of Biomedical Research (IIB Sant Pau), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Madrid, Spain
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  • Brit Mollenhauer MD,

    1. Paracelsus-Elena-Klinik, Kassel and Georg-August University Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany
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  • Maria C. Rodriguez-Oroz MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Clinic Universidad de Navarra, Medical School, Neuroscience Center, CIMA, Pamplona, Centros de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Madrid, Spain
    Current affiliation:
    1. Current address for Maria C. Rodriguez-Oroz: Department of Neurology, Hospital Donostia and BioDonostia, San Sebastian, Spain
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  • Alexander I. Tröster PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
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  • Daniel Weintraub MD

    1. Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and Parkinson's Disease and Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (PADRECC and MIRECC), Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Irene Litvan was funded by 5R01AG024040-04. Charles Adler has been a consultant for Ipsen and Merck Serono, has been on the advisory boards of Biogen Idec, Eli Lilly, Medtronic, and Merz, and has received grants from the Arizona Biomedical Research Commission and the Michael J. Fox Foundation. Alexander I. Tröster has been a consultant for Medtronic, Inc., St. Jude, and Boston Scientific, has been on the advisory boards of Medtronic, Inc. and St. Jude, has received honoraria from Medtronic and Boehringer Ingelheim, and has received grants from the National Parkinson Foundation, GlaxoSmithKline, and Medtronic, Inc.

  • Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

There is controversy regarding the definition and characteristics of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease. The Movement Disorder Society commissioned a Task Force to critically evaluate the literature and determine the frequency and characteristics of Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment and its association with dementia. A comprehensive PubMed literature review was conducted using systematic inclusion and exclusion criteria. A mean of 26.7% (range, 18.9%–38.2%) of nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease have mild cognitive impairment. The frequency of Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment increases with age, disease duration, and disease severity. Impairments occur in a range of cognitive domains, but single domain impairment is more common than multiple domain impairment, and within single domain impairment, nonamnestic is more common than amnestic impairment. A high proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment progress to dementia in a relatively short period of time. The primary conclusions of the Task Force are that: (1) Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment is common, (2) there is significant heterogeneity within Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment in the number and types of cognitive domain impairments, (3) Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment appears to place patients at risk of progressing to dementia, and (4) formal diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease–mild cognitive impairment are needed. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society

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