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Keywords:

  • cerebellar ataxia;
  • copy number variation;
  • dominant genetic conditions;
  • recessive genetic conditions;
  • spinocerebellar ataxia

Abstract

Background:

Sporadic-onset ataxia is common in a tertiary care setting but a significant percentage remains unidentified despite extensive evaluation. Rare genetic ataxias, reported only in specific populations or families, may contribute to a percentage of sporadic ataxia.

Methods:

Patients with adult-onset sporadic ataxia, who tested negative for common genetic ataxias (SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, SCA7, and/or Friedreich ataxia), were evaluated using a stratified screening approach for variants in 7 rare ataxia genes.

Results:

We screened patients for published mutations in SYNE1 (n = 80) and TGM6 (n = 118), copy number variations in LMNB1 (n = 40) and SETX (n = 11), sequence variants in SACS (n = 39) and PDYN (n = 119), and the pentanucleotide insertion of spinocerebellar ataxia type 31 (n = 101). Overall, we identified 1 patient with a LMNB1 duplication, 1 patient with a PDYN variant, and 1 compound SACS heterozygote, including a novel variant.

Conclusions:

The rare genetic ataxias examined here do not significantly contribute to sporadic cerebellar ataxia in our tertiary care population. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society