Rivastigmine as alternative treatment for refractory REM behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Raffaella Di Giacopo MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Movement Disorders Research Center, Department of Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy
    2. Achille e Linda Lorenzon Foundation, Treviso, Italy
    • Institute of Neurology, Catholic University, Largo Agostino Gemelli, 8 Rome 00168 Italy

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  • Alfonso Fasano MD, PhD,

    1. Movement Disorders Research Center, Department of Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy
    2. AFaR-Fatebenefratelli Association for Biomedical Research, Rome, Italy
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  • Davide Quaranta MD,

    1. Movement Disorders Research Center, Department of Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy
    2. Research Center for Neuropsychology, Department of Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy
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  • Giacomo Della Marca MD, PhD,

    1. Sleep Disorders Research Center, Department of Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy
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  • Francesco Bove MD,

    1. Movement Disorders Research Center, Department of Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy
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  • Anna Rita Bentivoglio MD, PhD

    1. Movement Disorders Research Center, Department of Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy
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  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Background:

We report on a double-blind, crossover pilot trial for the treatment of rapid eye movement behavior disorder (RBD) in 12 patients with Parkinson's disease in whom conventional therapy failed.

Methods:

We employed a patch of the cholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine at a dose of 4.6 mg/24 hours for 3 weeks compared with placebo to reduce the frequency of RBD episodes. The number of RBD episodes was monitored by diaries of bed partners.

Results:

Rivastigmine was well tolerated in most patients, with minor side effects, mainly related to peripheral cholinergic action, and significantly reduced the mean frequency of RBD episodes during the observation time.

Conclusions:

The results of this pilot trial need to be confirmed by further studies on a larger number of patients. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society

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