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Neuroimaging: Current role in detecting pre-motor Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Jana Godau MD,

    1. Center of Neurology, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, Department of Neurodegeneration and German Center of Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
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  • Anna Hussl MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
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  • Praween Lolekha MD,

    1. Pacific Parkinson's Research Centre, University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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  • A. Jon Stoessl MD,

    1. Pacific Parkinson's Research Centre, University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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  • Klaus Seppi MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
    • Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Austria, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria
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  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Convergent evidence suggests a pre-motor period in Parkinson's disease (PD) during which typical motor symptoms have not yet developed although dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra have started to degenerate. Advances in different neuroimaging techniques have allowed the detection of functional and structural changes in early PD. This review summarizes the state of the art knowledge concerning structural neuroimaging techniques including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transcranial B-mode-Doppler-sonography (TCS) as well as functional neuroimaging techniques using radiotracer imaging (RTI) with different radioligands in detecting pre-motor PD. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society

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