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Attenuated heart rate response in REM sleep behavior disorder and Parkinson's disease§

Authors

  • Gertrud Laura Sorensen MSc,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Electrical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark
    2. Danish Center for Sleep Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark
    3. Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    • Danish Center for Sleep Medicine, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup Hospital, DK 2600 Glostrup, Denmark
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  • Jacob Kempfner MSc,

    1. Department of Electrical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark
    2. Danish Center for Sleep Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark
    3. Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Marielle Zoetmulder MSc,

    1. Danish Center for Sleep Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark
    2. Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    3. Department of Neurology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Helge B. D. Sorensen MSc, PhD,

    1. Department of Electrical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark
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  • Poul Jennum MD, PhD

    1. Danish Center for Sleep Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark
    2. Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Funding agencies: The study is supported by an unrestricted grant from Center for Healthy Aging (CEHA), University of Copenhagen. The study is further part of the research in the Biomedical Signal Processing Research Group, Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Neither the CEHA nor the DTU had any further role in the study design, collection, analysis, and interpretation of data, the writing of the report, or the decision to submit the article for publication. None of the authors has reported any conflict of interests.

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • §

    Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine whether patients with Parkinson's disease with and without rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder and patients with idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder have an attenuated heart rate response to arousals or to leg movements during sleep compared with healthy controls. Fourteen and 16 Parkinson's patients with and without rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder, respectively, 11 idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder patients, and 17 control subjects underwent 1 night of polysomnography. The heart rate response associated with arousal or leg movement from all sleep stages was analyzed from 10 heartbeats before the onset of the sleep event to 15 heartbeats following onset of the sleep event. The heart rate reponse to arousals was significantly lower in both parkinsonian groups compared with the control group and the idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder group. The heart rate response to leg movement was significantly lower in both Parkinson's groups and in the idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder group compared with the control group. The heart rate response for the idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder group was intermediate with respect to the control and the parkinsonian groups. The attenuated heart rate response may be a manifestation of the autonomic deficits experienced in Parkinson's disease. The idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder patients not only exhibited impaired motor symptoms but also incipient autonomic dysfunction, as revealed by the attenuated heart rate response. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society

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