Changes on brief cognitive instruments over time in Parkinson's disease§

Authors

  • Stephanie Lessig MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurosciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA
    2. VA Medical Center San Diego, San Diego, California, USA
    • VA Medical Center (9127), 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161
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  • Dong Nie MS,

    1. Clinical and Translational Research Institute, Biostatistics Unit, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA
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  • Ronghui Xu MA, PhD,

    1. Clinical and Translational Research Institute, Biostatistics Unit, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA
    2. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine and Department of Mathematics, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA
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  • Jody Corey-Bloom MD, PhD

    1. Department of Neurosciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA
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  • Funding agencies: This work was funded by the VA Parkinson's Disease Research, Education, and Care Consortium.

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • §

    Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Two hundred and twenty-one subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) were examined using the Mini–Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), with a subset of these (n = 98) examined on repeat testing up to 3 years. The MoCA was more sensitive in identifying cognitive deficit, specifically in the domains of visuospatial abilities, language, and memory. In longitudinal study, the MMSE changed significantly over time, particularly in patients with disease duration of >10 years. The MoCA, however, did not change significantly, even when subjects were stratified by age, MMSE score, and disease duration. This suggests that the MoCA may be more sensitive for detecting early cognitive change in PD, but that the MMSE, and not the MoCA, may be better for tracking cognitive decline. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society

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