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Is there an increased risk of hip fracture in Parkinson's disease? A nationwide inpatient sample§

Authors

  • Rajib K. Bhattacharya MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Genetics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
    • Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Mail Stop 4023, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160
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  • Richard M. Dubinsky MD, MPH,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Sue Min Lai PhD,

    1. Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Hilary Dubinsky BS

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Initially presented as an abstract at the 62nd Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, April 13, 2010.

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Dr. Bhattacharya is a promotional speaker for Novartis and Amgen.

  • §

    Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Objective:

The aim of this study was to determine whether people with Parkinson's disease (PD) are overrepresented in a national cohort of hip-fracture admissions.

Background:

Frequent falls, combined with a higher rate of osteoporosis in people with PD, should lead to an increased risk of hip fracture.

Methods:

This work was a retrospective cohort analysis from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 1988 to 2007, a stratified sample of 20% of U.S. hospital admissions. Admissions with a primary diagnosis of acute hip fracture were identified, as was a subset with a secondary diagnosis of PD.

Results:

A total of 3.63% of 1,066,404 hip-fracture admissions had PD. When compared to the population of prevalence among patients with hip fracture, the prevalence of PD was up to 4.48 times (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.46, 4.49) more than predicted, and when adjusted for gender and age, it was 4.02 (95% CI: 4.00, 4.03).

Conclusions:

In this 20-year nationwide sample of hip fractures, patients with PD were overrepresented by a factor of 4. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society

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