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Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised for mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease§

Authors


  • Funding agencies: This work was supported by a National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Award to Addenbrooke's Hospital/University of Cambridge, as well as grants from Cure Parkinson's Trust and Parkinson's Disease UK. D.P.B., J.R.E., and C.H.W.G. have each been recipients of a Raymond and Beverly Sackler Studentship.

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • §

    Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Introduction:

Cognitive impairment is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), even in the early stages, and appropriate screening tools are needed.

Methods:

We investigated the utility of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised for detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in PD in an incident population-representative cohort (n = 132) and investigated the relationship between performance on this instrument and behavior and quality of life (n = 219).

Results:

Twenty-two percent met criteria for MCI. Receiver operating curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.81. A cutoff <89 gave a sensitivity of 69% and specificity of 84%. Scores on this instrument were highly correlated with the Parkinson's Disease Cognitive Rating Scale, and there were significant correlations with the Cambridge Behavioral Inventory-Revised and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire 39.

Conclusion:

This instrument is a useful screening tool for PD-MCI, and poor performance is significantly related to impaired behavior and quality of life. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society

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