Get access

Enlarged hyperechogenic substantia nigra as a risk marker for Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Daniela Berg MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center of Neurology, Department of Neurodegeneration and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    • Correspondence to: Prof. Daniela Berg, Department of Neurodegeneration, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, Hoppe Seyler-Strasse 3, D-72076 Tübingen, Germany; daniela.berg@uni-tuebingen.de

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stefanie Behnke MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Homburg/Saar, Homburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Dr. Behnke and Dr. Seppi contributed equally

  • Klaus Seppi MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Dr. Behnke and Dr. Seppi contributed equally

  • Jana Godau MD,

    1. Center of Neurology, Department of Neurodegeneration and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stefanie Lerche PhD,

    1. Center of Neurology, Department of Neurodegeneration and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Philipp Mahlknecht MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Inga Liepelt-Scarfone PhD,

    1. Center of Neurology, Department of Neurodegeneration and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Christoph Pausch,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Homburg/Saar, Homburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Niko Schneider,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Homburg/Saar, Homburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Alexandra Gaenslen MD,

    1. Center of Neurology, Department of Neurodegeneration and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kathrin Brockmann MD,

    1. Center of Neurology, Department of Neurodegeneration and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Karin Srulijes MD,

    1. Center of Neurology, Department of Neurodegeneration and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Heiko Huber MD,

    1. Center of Neurology, Department of Neurodegeneration and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Isabel Wurster,

    1. Center of Neurology, Department of Neurodegeneration and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Heike Stockner MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stefan Kiechl MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Johann Willeit MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Arno Gasperi MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Bruneck Hospital, Bruneck, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Klaus Fassbender MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Homburg/Saar, Homburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Thomas Gasser MD,

    1. Center of Neurology, Department of Neurodegeneration and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Werner Poewe MD

    1. Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Funding agencies: This work was supported by The Michael J. Fox Foundation. Additionally, P.M. has been sponsored by a research grant from the Medical University of Innsbruck (IFTZ 2007152).

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Background

SN hyperechogenicity (SN+), determined by transcranial sonography, has been proposed as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, we reported a 17.4-fold increased risk for PD in individuals with SN+ older than 50 years within 3 years.

Methods

This is the second follow-up of a prospective, longitudinal, three-center observational study after 5 years. Of the initial 1,847 at baseline PD-free participants 50 years or older, 1,271 underwent the 5-year reassessment.

Results

Within 5 years, 21 individuals developed incident PD. Participants with SN+ at baseline had a more than 20.6 times increased risk to develop PD in this time span than those without this echo feature.

Conclusion

We thus confirm our finding of the 3-year follow-up examination in a longer observation time and higher number of individuals with incident PD and suggest SN+ as an important risk marker for PD. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary