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Polychlorinated biphenyls in prospectively collected serum and Parkinson's disease risk§

Authors

  • Marc G. Weisskopf PhD, ScD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    3. The Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    • Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, Landmark Center, 3rd Floor East, PO Box 15697, Boston, MA 02215, USA
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  • Paul Knekt PhD,

    1. National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland
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  • Eilis J. O'Reilly ScD,

    1. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Jukka Lyytinen MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
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  • Antti Reunanen MD,

    1. National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland
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  • Francine Laden ScD,

    1. Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    3. The Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Larisa Altshul MS,

    1. Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Environmental Health & Engineering, Needham, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Alberto Ascherio MD

    1. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    2. The Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    3. Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Funding agencies: This study was funded by NIEHS grant R01 ES012667.

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • §

    Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Evidence suggests possible Parkinson's disease (PD)–relevant neural effects of exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls. Limited epidemiological evidence suggests that polychlorinated biphenyl exposure may increase PD risk, but no studies have involved biomarkers of polychlorinated biphenyl exposure before PD onset. We examined the prospective association between serum polychlorinated biphenyls and PD. We conducted a nested case–control study within the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey with serum samples collected during 1968–1972 and analyzed in 2005–2007 for polychlorinated biphenyls. Incident PD cases were identified through the Social Insurance Institution's registry and were confirmed by medical record review (n = 101). Controls (n = 349) were matched on age, sex, municipality, and vital status. We used logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratios. There was no evidence of increasing risk of PD with increasing polychlorinated biphenyl exposure in adjusted analyses. Instead, there was a trend toward lower odds of PD with increasing serum polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations, which was most pronounced for the sum of all measured polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and the sum of dioxin-like congeners. Compared with that of those in the lowest quintile, the odds ratio of PD among those in the highest quintile of total polychlorinated biphenyls was 0.29 (95% confidence interval, 0.12–0.70; P trend = .02) and for dioxin-like congeners was 0.34 (95% confidence interval, 0.13–0.90; P trend = .05). These results do not support an increased risk of PD from polychlorinated biphenyl exposure and instead suggest a possible protective effect of polychlorinated biphenyl exposure. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society

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