Characterization of peripheral hematopoietic stem cells and monocytes in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Natalja Funk PhD,

    1. Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Natalja Funk and Peter Wieghofer contributed equally to this work.

  • Peter Wieghofer MS,

    1. Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Natalja Funk and Peter Wieghofer contributed equally to this work.

  • Sabrina Grimm,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine II Division of Hematology, Oncology, Immunology, Rheumatology, and Pneumonology, Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, University Clinic of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Richard Schaefer MD,

    1. Institute of Clinical and Experimental Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic of Tuebingen, Germany
    2. Stanford Institute for Neuro-Innovation and Translational Neurosciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hans-Jörg Bühring PhD,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine II Division of Hematology, Oncology, Immunology, Rheumatology, and Pneumonology, Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, University Clinic of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Thomas Gasser MD,

    1. Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Saskia Biskup MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    • Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tuebingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Funding agencies: This study was supported by the Gemeinnützige Hertie-Stiftung and the University of Tübingen.

    Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

    Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

  • Author Roles: Natalja Funk and Saskia Biskup designed the study, Natalja Funk and Peter Wieghofer performed all experiments, Sabrina Grimm helped with the flow-cytometric experiments, Richard Schaefer helped in establishing and analyzing the CFC assay, Hans-Jörg Bühring and Thomas Gasser helped with critical discussions, and Natalja Funk, Peter Wieghofer, and Saskia Biskup wrote the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Correspondence to: Saskia Biskup, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Otfried-Mueller Str. 27, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany. E-mail: saskia.biskup@medizin.uni-tuebingen.de

Abstract

Background

Emerging evidence has highlighted the pivotal role of the immune system in neurodegenerative diseases. This study investigated the impact of progressive neurodegeneration on the differentiation and development of hematopoietic stem cells in the peripheral blood of Parkinson's patients. Methods: A colony-forming cell assay was established to study hematopoietic stem cells from venous blood of Parkinson's patients, and flow cytometry was used to analyze the expression of chemokine receptors on monocytes.

Results

We demonstrate that there is strong upregulation in the percentage of monocyte precursors in the peripheral blood of Parkinson's patients and asymptomatic high-risk individuals. We identify the receptor CCR2 as undergoing strong upregulation on the surface of classical monocytes in Parkinson's patients.

Conclusions

The association between blood cell development and progressive cell death in the brain of Parkinson's patients should be further investigated as a potential dynamic biomarker and indicator of disease progression. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society

Ancillary