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Diffusion tensor imaging of Parkinson's disease, atypical parkinsonism, and essential tremor

Authors

  • Janey Prodoehl PhD,

    1. Physical Therapy Program, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois, USA
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  • Hong Li PhD,

    1. Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Peggy J. Planetta PhD,

    1. Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
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  • Christopher G. Goetz MD,

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Kathleen M. Shannon MD,

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Ruth Tangonan,

    1. Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Cynthia L. Comella MD,

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Tanya Simuni MD,

    1. Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Xiaohong Joe Zhou PhD,

    1. Department of Radiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    2. Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    3. Center for MR Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Sue Leurgans PhD,

    1. Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    2. Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    3. Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Daniel M. Corcos PhD,

    1. Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    2. Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    3. Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • David E. Vaillancourt PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
    3. Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
    • Correspondence to: Dr. David E. Vaillancourt, University of Florida, Room 100, FLG, Gainesville, FL 32611-8205, USA; vcourt@ufl.edu

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  • Funding agencies: This study was supported by grants from the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, National Institutes of Health (R01-NS-52318, R01-NS-75012, R01-NS-58487), and the Parkinson's Disease Foundation (Parkinson Research Center grant).

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report

ABSTRACT

Diffusion tensor imaging could be useful in characterizing movement disorders because it noninvasively examines multiple brain regions simultaneously. We report a multitarget imaging approach focused on the basal ganglia and cerebellum in Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and essential tremor and in healthy controls. Seventy-two subjects were studied with a diffusion tensor imaging protocol at 3 Tesla. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to directly compare groups. Sensitivity and specificity values were quantified for control versus movement disorder (92% sensitivity, 88% specificity), control versus parkinsonism (93% sensitivity, 91% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus atypical parkinsonism (90% sensitivity, 100% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus multiple system atrophy (94% sensitivity, 100% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus progressive supranuclear palsy (87% sensitivity, 100% specificity), multiple system atrophy versus progressive supranuclear palsy (90% sensitivity, 100% specificity), and Parkinson's disease versus essential tremor (92% sensitivity, 87% specificity). The brain targets varied for each comparison, but the substantia nigra, putamen, caudate, and middle cerebellar peduncle were the most frequently selected brain regions across classifications. These results indicate that using diffusion tensor imaging of the basal ganglia and cerebellum accurately classifies subjects diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, atypical parkinsonism, and essential tremor and clearly distinguishes them from control subjects. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

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