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Primary dystonia: Moribund or viable

Authors

  • Susan B. Bressman MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA
    • Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
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  • Rachel Saunders-Pullman MD, MPH

    1. Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA
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  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Dr. Bressman serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation, and the Scientific Advisory Board of the Bachmann-Strauss Dystonia and Parkinson Disease Foundation and the Scientific Advisory Board of the Michael J Fox Foundation. She receives research support from the Michael J Fox Foundation and has consulted for Bristol Myer Squibb. She received royalty payments from Beth Israel/Mount Sinai/Athena for DYT6 testing.Dr. Saunders-Pullman serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation. She receives research support from the NIH (K02 NS073836), the Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, the Bachmann-Strauss Dystonia and Parkinson's Foundation, the Marcled Foundation and the Empire State Clinical Research Training Program.

Correspondence to: Dr. Susan Bressman, Department of Neurology, PACC, Suite 5J, Beth Israel Medical Center, 10 Union Square East, New York, NY 10003; SBressma@chpnet.org

ABSTRACT

With increasing understanding of dystonia genetic etiologies and pathophysiology there has been renewed scrutiny and reappraisal of dystonia classification schemes and nomenclature. One important category that includes both clinical and etiologic criteria is primary dystonia. This editorialized review discusses the impact of recent findings on primary dystonia criteria and argues that it remains useful in clinical and research practice. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society

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