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Mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is associated with increased cortical degeneration

Authors

  • Alexandru Hanganu MD, PhD,

    1. Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
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    • Christophe Bedetti and Alexandru Hanganu contributed equally to this article.

  • Christophe Bedetti MSc,

    1. Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
    2. Centre d'Études Avancées en Médicine du Sommeil, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
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    • Christophe Bedetti and Alexandru Hanganu contributed equally to this article.

  • Thomas Jubault PhD,

    1. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Jean-Francois Gagnon PhD,

    1. Centre d'Études Avancées en Médicine du Sommeil, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
    2. Department of Psychology, Université du Québec ̀ Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Béatriz Mejia-Constain PhD,

    1. Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Clotilde Degroot MSc,

    1. Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
    2. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Anne-Louise Lafontaine MD, MSc, FRCP(C),

    1. Movement Disorders Unit, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Sylvain Chouinard MD, FRCP(C),

    1. Unité des Troubles du Movement André Barbeau, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Oury Monchi PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
    2. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    • Correspondence to: Dr. Oury Monchi, Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, 4565 Chemin Queen Mary, Montréal, Québec, H3W 1W5 Canada; oury.monchi@umontreal.ca

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  • Funding agencies: This work was supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research grant [MOP 126017] and by a grant from the Parkinson Society Canada Psychosocial grant to O.M. T.J. was supported by a postdoctoral award from the Parkinson Society Canada.

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Dr. Hanganu received grants from Quebec Bio-Imaging Network; Dr. Gagnon received grants from Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Fonds de Recherche du Québec - Santé; and Dr. Monchi received grants from Canadian Institutes of Health Research (operating grants), Parkinson Society Canada, Fonds de la Recherche du Quebec Santé, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  • Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

ABSTRACT

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can occur early in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD), and its presence increases the risk of developing dementia. Determining the cortical changes associated with MCI in PD, thus, may be useful in predicting the future development of dementia. To address this objective, 37 patients with PD, divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence MCI (18 with and 19 without) and 16 matched controls, underwent anatomic magnetic resonance imaging. Corticometry analyses were performed to measure the changes in cortical thickness and surface area as well as their correlation with disease duration. Compared with healthy controls, the PD-MCI group exhibited increased atrophy and changes of local surface area in the bilateral occipital, left temporal, and frontal cortices; whereas the PD non-MCI group exhibited only unilateral thinning and decreased surface area in the occipital lobe and in the frontal cortex. In addition, a comparison between the PD-MCI and PD non-MCI groups revealed increased local surface area in the occipital lobe, temporal lobe, and postcentral gyrus for the cognitively impaired patients. It is noteworthy that, in the PD-MCI group, cortical thickness had a significant negative correlation with disease duration in the precentral, supramarginal, occipital, and superior temporal cortices; whereas, in the PD non-MCI group, such a correlation was absent. The findings from this study reveal that, at the same stage of PD evolution, the presence of MCI is associated with a higher level of cortical changes, suggesting that cortical degeneration is increased in patients with PD because of the presence of MCI. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

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