Subthalamus deep brain stimulation for primary dystonia patients: A long-term follow-up study

Authors

  • Chunyan Cao PhD,

    1. Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
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    • Chunyan Cao and Yixin Pan contributed equally to this work.

  • Yixin Pan MD,

    1. Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
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  • Dianyou Li MD,

    1. Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
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  • Shikun Zhan MD,

    1. Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
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  • Jing Zhang MD,

    1. Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
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  • Bomin Sun MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
    • Correspondence to: Dr. Bomin Sun, Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025, P. R. China; bominsun@sh163.net

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  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

ABSTRACT

Background

Deep brain stimulation has generated sustained improvement in motor function for patients with dystonia, but the long-term impact of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on dystonia has not been elucidated.

Methods

Patients with primary dystonia underwent bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation and were evaluated with the Burke–Fahn–Marsden dystonia rating scale and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form General Health Survey at baseline and 1 month, 1 year, and 3 to 10 years postoperatively.

Results

Improvements in motor function according to the Burke–Fahn–Marsden dystonia rating scale at 1 month, 1 year, and 3 to 10 years of stimulation were 55%, 77%, and 79%, respectively. The quality of life improved after 1 month of stimulation (P < 0.001), progressed within 1 year (P < 0.001), and then remained stable. Disease duration was negatively correlated with an improvement in motor function.

Conclusions

Our results demonstrate that the subthalamus is an alternative to the globus pallidus internus as a target for deep brain stimulation to treat primary dystonia. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

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