Quantitative wearable sensors for objective assessment of Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Walter Maetzler MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, Department of Neurodegeneration, Center of Neurology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Tuebingen, Germany
    • Correspondence to: Dr. Walter Maetzler, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany; walter.maetzler@uni-tuebingen.de

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  • Josefa Domingos,

    1. Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
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  • Karin Srulijes MD,

    1. Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, Department of Neurodegeneration, Center of Neurology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    2. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Tuebingen, Germany
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  • Joaquim J. Ferreira MD, PhD,

    1. Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
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  • Bastiaan R. Bloem MD, PhD

    1. Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Department of Neurology and Parkinson Centre Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Funding agencies: Part of the EU project SENSE-PARK, funded under the Seventh Framework Programme, Cooperation-ICT, #288557.

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

ABSTRACT

There is a rapidly growing interest in the quantitative assessment of Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated signs and disability using wearable technology. Both persons with PD and their clinicians see advantages in such developments. Specifically, quantitative assessments using wearable technology may allow for continuous, unobtrusive, objective, and ecologically valid data collection. Also, this approach may improve patient-doctor interaction, influence therapeutic decisions, and ultimately ameliorate patients' global health status. In addition, such measures have the potential to be used as outcome parameters in clinical trials, allowing for frequent assessments; eg, in the home setting. This review discusses promising wearable technology, addresses which parameters should be prioritized in such assessment strategies, and reports about studies that have already investigated daily life issues in PD using this new technology. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

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