Idiopathic head tremor in english bulldogs

Authors

  • Julien Guevar DVM,

    1. School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
    2. Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, England
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  • Steven De Decker DVM, PhD,

    1. Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, England
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  • Luc M.L. Van Ham DVM, PhD, DECVN,

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Clinical Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium
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  • Andrea Fischer DVM, PhD, DECVN,

    1. Clinic of Small Animal Medicine, Center of Veterinary Sciences, Ludwig-Maximillians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany
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  • Holger A. Volk DVM, PhD, DECVN

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, England
    • Correspondence to: Dr. Holger A. Volk, Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, England; Email: hvolk@rvc.ac.uk

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  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

  • Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Idiopathic head tremor (IHT) syndrome is a recognized but poorly characterized movement disorder in English bulldogs (EBs). The data analyzed were collected via a detailed online questionnaire and video recordings. Thirty-eight percent of the population demonstrated IHT. The first presentation was early in life. There was no sex or neutered status predisposition. The condition disappeared with time in 50% of the cases. The direction of the head movement was vertical or horizontal. The number of episodes per day and the duration of the episodes were greatly variable. The majority of episodes occurred at rest. Most of the episodes were unpredictable. And there was no alteration of the mental status for most dogs during the episodes. Stress has been reported as a suspected trigger factor. IHT in EBs can be considered an idiopathic paroxysmal movement disorder. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

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