SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • dyskinesia;
  • Parkinson's disease;
  • synaptic plasticity;
  • dendritic spine;
  • morphologic change

ABSTRACT

Maladaptive plasticity at corticostriatal synapses plays an important role in the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesia. Recently, it has been shown that synaptic plasticity is closely linked to morphologic changes of dendritic spines. To evaluate morphologic changes of dendritic spines of two types of striatal medium spiny neurons, which project to the internal segment of globus pallidus or the external segment of globus pallidus, in the levodopa-induced dyskinesia model, we used 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats chronically treated with levodopa. Dendritic spines were decreased and became enlarged in the direct pathway neurons of the model of levodopa-induced dyskinesia. The same levodopa treatment to normal rats, in which no dyskinesia was observed, also induced enlargement of dendritic spines, but not a decrease in density of spines in the direct pathway neurons. These results suggest that a loss and enlargement of dendritic spines in the direct pathway neurons plays important roles in the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesia. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society