Subthalamic stimulation improves motor function but not home and neighborhood mobility

Authors

  • Jean-François Daneault PhD(c),

    1. Cone Laboratory for Research in Neurosurgery, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    2. Centre de Recherche de l'Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Christian Duval PhD,

    1. Centre de Recherche de l'Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
    2. Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Sébastien Barbat-Artigas PhD(c),

    1. Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Mylène Aubertin-Leheudre PhD,

    1. Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
    2. Département de Kinanthropologie, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Nicolas Jodoin MD, FRCP(c),

    1. Unité des troubles du mouvement André-Barbeau, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Michel Panisset MD, FRCP(c),

    1. Unité des troubles du mouvement André-Barbeau, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Abbas F. Sadikot MD, PhD, FRCS(c)

    Corresponding author
    1. Cone Laboratory for Research in Neurosurgery, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    • Correspondence to: Abbas F. Sadikot MD, PhD, FRCSC, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, McGill University, 3801 University Street, Room: 688, Montreal, H3A 2B4 Canada, E-mail: abbas.sadikot@mcgill.ca

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  • Funding agencies: This study was supported by Parkinson Society Canada Graduate Student Award (Daneault) and a Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) Doctoral scholarship (Barbat-Artigas). Drs. Duval and Aubertin-Leheudre are supported by a Fonds de la Recherche du Québec-Santé salary grant. This work is also supported by operating grants to Drs. Sadikot and Duval from the CIHR and the Parkinson's Society of Canada

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Drs. Daneault, Barbat-Artigas, Aubertin-Leheudre, Duval, and Sadikot declare that they have no competing interests. Dr. Jodoin received research grants from AbbVie and travel grants from Teva Canada Innovation. Dr. Panisset received research grants from Teva Neuroscience, Novartis, and Allergan. He was a lecturer for Allergan, Merz, Novartis and Teva. He participated in advisory boards for Merck, EMD Serono, Allergan, Merz, Novartis, and Teva.Author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

  • Author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

ABSTRACT

Objective

Subthalamic (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a recognized therapy for alleviating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about its impact on mobility, an important component of quality of life (QoL). To address this issue, we assessed the impact of STN DBS on life-space mobility and QoL.

Methods

Twenty surgical patients with PD were assessed using mobility and QoL scales and the United Parkinson's disease rating scale, and results were compared before surgery and 6 to 9 months postoperatively.

Results

STN DBS significantly improved motor dysfunction but had a limited impact on measures of life-space mobility and QoL.

Interpretation

STN DBS improves motor function and some components of QoL. However, motor recovery does not translate into improved life-space in the intermediate term. In addition to a focus on motor function, multidisciplinary attention to increasing mobility may further improve QoL in the intermediate and long-term. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

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