Action inhibition in Tourette syndrome

Authors

  • Christos Ganos,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Hamburg, Germany
    2. Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, University College London Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom
    3. Department of Paediatric and Adult Movement Disorders and Neuropsychiatry, Institute of Neurogenetics, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
    • Correspondence to: Dr. Christos Ganos, Movement Disorders Research Group, Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg—Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany, E-mail: cganos@gmail.com

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    • Equal contribution to the manuscript

  • Simone Kühn,

    1. Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany
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    • Equal contribution to the manuscript

  • Ursula Kahl,

    1. Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Hamburg, Germany
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  • Odette Schunke,

    1. Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Hamburg, Germany
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  • Jan Feldheim,

    1. Brain Imaging and Neurostimulation Laboratory, Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Hamburg, Germany
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  • Christian Gerloff,

    1. Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Hamburg, Germany
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  • Veit Roessner,

    1. Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Dresden Medical School, Dresden, Germany
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  • Tobias Bäumer,

    1. Department of Paediatric and Adult Movement Disorders and Neuropsychiatry, Institute of Neurogenetics, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
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  • Götz Thomalla,

    1. Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Hamburg, Germany
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  • Patrick Haggard,

    1. Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, United Kingdom
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  • Alexander Münchau

    1. Department of Paediatric and Adult Movement Disorders and Neuropsychiatry, Institute of Neurogenetics, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
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  • Funding agencies: This study was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (MU1692/2-1) and the European Science Foundation.

  • Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (MU1692/2-1) and the European Science Foundation.

  • Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by tics. Tic generation is often linked to dysfunction of inhibitory brain networks. Some previous behavioral studies found deficiencies in inhibitory motor control in Tourette syndrome, but others suggested normal or even better-than-normal performance. Furthermore, neural correlates of action inhibition in these patients are poorly understood. We performed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging during a stop-signal reaction-time task in 14 uncomplicated adult Tourette patients and 15 healthy controls. In patients, we correlated activations in stop-signal reaction-time task with their individual motor tic frequency. Task performance was similar in both groups. Activation of dorsal premotor cortex was stronger in the StopSuccess than in the Go condition in healthy controls. This pattern was reversed in Tourette patients. A significant positive correlation was present between motor tic frequency and activations in the supplementary motor area during StopSuccess versus Go in patients. Inhibitory brain networks differ between healthy controls and Tourette patients. In the latter the supplementary motor area is probably a key relay of inhibitory processes mediating both suppression of tics and inhibition of voluntary action. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

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