Pain in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Dr. Christopher G. Goetz,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush–Presbyterian–St. Lukes Medical Center and Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
    • 1725 W. Harrison Street, Chicago, IL 60612, U.S.A.
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  • Caroline M. Tanner,

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush–Presbyterian–St. Lukes Medical Center and Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
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  • Mark Levy,

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush–Presbyterian–St. Lukes Medical Center and Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
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  • Robert S. Wilson,

    1. Department of Psychology, Rush–Presbyterian–St. Lukes Medical Center and Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
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  • David C. Garron

    1. Department of Psychology, Rush–Presbyterian–St. Lukes Medical Center and Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
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Abstract

We studied the prevalence and character of pain in Parkinson's disease (PD) and its association with motor fluctuations. Of 95 outpatients, 46% experienced pain they attributed to PD. Patients with pain were younger but no more disabled on objective motor scores than patients without pain. Musculoskeletal, dystonic, and join pains were most frequent. Painful episodes, especially musculoskeletal cramps, usually occurred when parkinsonian disability was maximal.

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