Anticholinergic-induced chorea in the treatment of focal dystonia

Authors

  • M. Nomoto,

    1. University Department of Neurology and Parkinson's Disease Society Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry and King's College Hospital Medical School, Denmark Hill, London, England
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  • P. D. Thompson,

    1. University Department of Neurology and Parkinson's Disease Society Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry and King's College Hospital Medical School, Denmark Hill, London, England
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  • M. P. Sheehy,

    1. University Department of Neurology and Parkinson's Disease Society Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry and King's College Hospital Medical School, Denmark Hill, London, England
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  • N. P. Quinn,

    1. University Department of Neurology and Parkinson's Disease Society Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry and King's College Hospital Medical School, Denmark Hill, London, England
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  • C. D. Marsden

    Corresponding author
    1. University Department of Neurology and Parkinson's Disease Society Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry and King's College Hospital Medical School, Denmark Hill, London, England
    • University Department of Neurology and Parkinson's Disease Society Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry and King's College Hospital Medical School, Denmark Hill, London SE5, England
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Abstract

The occurrence of chorea, induced by trihexyphenidyl (benzhexol hydrochloride) during the treatment of five adult patients who had focal or segmental dystonia, is described. The dose at which chorea appeared ranged from 15 to 60 mg/day (mean 31.7 mg/day). All but one patient had developed common adverse effects of this drug (dry mouth, blurred vision, and confusion) at lower doses (mean 21.8 mg per day). There was an inverse relationship between the age of the patient and the dose of trihexyphenidyl at which chorea developed.

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