Spontaneous orofacial dyskinesias in a captive cynomolgus monkey: Implications for tardive dyskinesia

Authors

  • Dr. N. M. J. Rupniak,

    Corresponding author
    1. Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories, Neuroscience Research Centre, Terlings Park, Harlow, Essex, England
    • Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories, Neuroscience Research Center, Terlings Park, Eastwick Road, Harlow, Essex, CM20 2QR, U.K.
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  • S. J. Tye,

    1. Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories, Neuroscience Research Centre, Terlings Park, Harlow, Essex, England
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  • M. J. Steventon,

    1. Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories, Neuroscience Research Centre, Terlings Park, Harlow, Essex, England
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  • S. Boyce,

    1. Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories, Neuroscience Research Centre, Terlings Park, Harlow, Essex, England
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  • S. D. Iversen

    1. Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories, Neuroscience Research Centre, Terlings Park, Harlow, Essex, England
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Abstract

We describe a syndrome of spontaneous orofacial dyskinesias and cage stereotypies in a singly housed adult cynomolgus monkey never previously exposed to neuroleptic drugs. Abnormal movements were readily suppressed by acute treatment with haloperidol (0.03–0.24 mg/kg i.m.) or SCH23390 (0.05–0.2 mg/kg i.m.) but not by physostigmine (0.005–0.04 mg/kg i.m.) or scopolamine (0.0025–0.04 mg/kg i.m.). The symptomatology and response to pharmacological manipulations was indistinguishable from that previously attributed to chronic neuroleptic treatment in primates. Our findings indicate that neuroleptic-induced tardive dyskinesias in most primate studies have not been clearly demonstrated.

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