Review and videotape recognition of idiopathic restless legs syndrome

Authors

  • Arthur S. Walters,

    Corresponding author
    1. Movement Disorder Group, Department of Neurology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, and Neurology Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Lyons, New Jersey, U.S.A.
    • 408B MEB, Department of Neurology CN 19, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903–0019, U.S.A.
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  • Wayne A. Hening,

    1. Movement Disorder Group, Department of Neurology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, and Neurology Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Lyons, New Jersey, U.S.A.
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  • Sudhansu Chokroverty

    1. Movement Disorder Group, Department of Neurology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, and Neurology Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Lyons, New Jersey, U.S.A.
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Abstract

The motor phenomena associated with idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS) are infrequently seen in the physician's office because they are present only after prolonged sitting or lying and usually at night. These motor phenomena are captured on videotape in four unrelated patients with idiopathic RLS. The clinical features of idiopathic RLS are reviewed in detail, and therapeutic advances in its treatment are summarized.

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