• StribildTM;
  • DAAs;
  • AIC316;
  • AIC246;
  • FV-100;
  • GS-7340;
  • CMX001;
  • ST-246;
  • peramivir;
  • laninamivir octanoate;
  • HBV inhibitors;
  • filovirus inhibitors


Prominent in the current stage of antiviral drug development are: (i) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the use of fixed-dose combinations (FDCs), the most recent example being StribildTM; (ii) for hepatitis C virus (HCV), the pleiade of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) that should be formulated in the most appropriate combinations so as to obtain a cure of the infection; (iii)–(v) new strategies (i.e., AIC316, AIC246, and FV-100) for the treatment of herpesvirus infections: herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV), respectively; (vi) the role of a new tenofovir prodrug, tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) (GS-7340) for the treatment of HIV infections; (vii) the potential use of poxvirus inhibitors (CMX001 and ST-246); (viii) the usefulness of new influenza virus inhibitors (peramivir and laninamivir octanoate); (ix) the position of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) inhibitors [lamivudine, adefovir dipivoxil, entecavir, telbivudine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)]; and (x) the potential of new compounds such as FGI-103, FGI-104, FGI-106, dUY11, and LJ-001 for the treatment of filoviruses (i.e., Ebola). Whereas for HIV and HCV therapy is aimed at multiple-drug combinations, for all other viruses, HSV, CMV, VZV, pox, influenza, HBV, and filoviruses, current strategies are based on the use of single compounds.