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Abstract

In a society that is increasingly diverse in culture, language, and technology, the field of information science education has continued to evolve and respond to the changing information environment. The iSchool movement has attracted a good number of library and information science programs, as well as programs in computer science, while many library and information science programs have revised their mission and curricula to meet the information needs of a pluralistic world without changing the name of their programs (they are often referred to as the LIS Schools). Although iSchools and LIS Schools may seem dichotomous, many of these schools share the history of library and information science education and may have more in common than their names imply. The proposed panel is designed to shed light on the diversity and commonality of information science education in the 21st century by examining the similarities and differences of these two types of schools (including their relationship to the tradition of library and information science education) and the extent to which these schools are meeting the needs of a pluralistic world.

The panel will have two parts. Part One is a report on the curricula offered at ALA-accredited LIS schools and iSchools. In Part Two panelists will respond to the curriculum analysis report and address these topics:

  • Their school's relationship to the tradition of library and information science education.

  • Their experience in changing from an LIS School to an iSchool.

  • Their rationale for remaining an LIS School and how they have changed their programs to meet the need of a pluralistic society.

  • Their perspectives on how they are meeting market needs.

  • Their experience in recruiting new students and placing graduates in libraries and non-library information environments.