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Mechanistic issues concerning cancer prevention by tea catechins

Authors

  • Chung S. Yang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Biology and Center for Cancer Prevention Research, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ, USA
    • Department of Chemical Biology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 164 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8020, USA Fax: +1-732-445-0687
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  • Hong Wang

    1. Department of Chemical Biology and Center for Cancer Prevention Research, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ, USA
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Abstract

The cancer preventive activities of tea (Camellia sinensis, Theaceae) have been demonstrated in animal models for cancers at different organ sites and suggested by some epidemiological studies. Many mechanisms for cancer prevention have been proposed based on studies in cell lines, which demonstrated the modulation of signal transduction and metabolic pathways by (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant and active polyphenol in green tea. These molecular events may result in cellular changes, such as enhancement of apoptosis, suppression of cell proliferation, and inhibition of angiogenesis. Nevertheless, it is not known whether these are the molecular mechanisms of inhibition of carcinogenesis in animals and humans. This article discusses the key issues involved in extrapolating results from cell line studies to mechanistic information in vivo and in translating animal studies to human cancer prevention.

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