Gene expression response of mouse lung, liver and white adipose tissue to β-carotene supplementation, knockout of Bcmo1 and sex

Authors

  • Yvonne G. J. van Helden,

    1. Human and Animal Physiology, Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Research Institute NUTRIM, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
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  • Roger W. L. Godschalk,

    1. Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Research Institute NUTRIM, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
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  • Johannes von Lintig,

    1. Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, OH, USA
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  • Georg Lietz,

    1. School of AFRD, Newcastle University, UK
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  • Jean-Francois Landrier,

    1. UMR 1260 INRA/Universite Aix-Marseille I et II, Marseille, France
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  • M. Luisa Bonet,

    1. Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Nutrition and Biotechnology, University of the Balearic Islands (UIB) and CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Palma de Mallorca, Spain
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  • Frederik J. van Schooten,

    1. Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Research Institute NUTRIM, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
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  • Jaap Keijer

    Corresponding author
    1. Human and Animal Physiology, Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
    • Human and Animal Physiology, Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, P. O. Box 338, 6700 AH Wageningen, The Netherlands Fax: +31-317-484077
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Abstract

Scope: Little information is available on differences, commonalities and especially interactions in overall gene expression responses as a result of diet, differences in sex (male and female) and effects induced by differences in metabolism. Moreover, it is unknown whether such effects are tissue specific.

Methods and results: We investigated the gene expression effects induced by β-carotene (BC) supplementation, knockout of β-carotene 15,15-monooxygenase 1 (Bcmo1) and differences between male and female mice in lung, liver and inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT). Unsupervised principal component analysis showed that lung gene expression was most affected by knockout of Bcmo1. Liver was most affected by knockout of Bcmo1 and differences in sex. iWAT was most affected by differences in sex. Hardly any genes were commonly influenced by BC among the three tissues. The effect of BC supplementation and knockout of Bcmo1 were relatively sex specific, especially in iWAT.

Conclusion: These data demonstrate that gene expression differences induced by BC are limited to the tissue and sex that is analyzed, and that differences in metabolism induced by for example single nucleotide polymorphisms, should be taken into account as much as possible. Moreover, our results indicate that translation from one tissue to the other should be done with caution for any nutritional intervention.

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