Excess dietary iodine differentially affects thyroid gene expression in diabetes, thyroiditis-prone versus -resistant BioBreeding (BB) rats

Authors

  • Eleonora Swist,

    1. Nutrition Research Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Banting Research Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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  • QiXuan Chen,

    1. Nutrition Research Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Banting Research Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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  • Cunye Qiao,

    1. Bureau of Food Surveillance and Science Integration, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Banting Research Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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  • Don Caldwell,

    1. Scientific Services Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Banting Research Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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  • Heidi Gruber,

    1. Nutrition Research Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Banting Research Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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  • Kylie A. Scoggan

    Corresponding author
    1. Nutrition Research Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Banting Research Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    • Research Scientist, Nutrition Research Division, Food Directorate, HPFB, 2203E Banting Research Centre, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K9, Canada Fax: +1-613-941-6182
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Abstract

Scope: To identify genes involved in the susceptibility to iodine-induced autoimmune thyroiditis.

Methods and results: Diabetes, thyroiditis-prone (BBdp) and -resistant (BBc) rats were fed either a control or a high-iodine diet for 9 wk. Excess iodine intake increased the incidence of insulitis and thyroiditis in BBdp rats. BBdp rats fed the high-iodine diet that did not develop thyroiditis had higher mRNA levels of Fabp4, Cidec, perilipin, Pparγ and Slc36a2 than BBdp rats fed the control diet and BBc rats fed either the control or the high-iodine diet. BBdp rats fed the high-iodine diet that did develop thyroiditis had higher mRNA levels of Cidec, Icam1, Ifitm1, and Slpi than BBdp rats fed the control diet and BBc rats fed either the control or the high-iodine diet. BBdp rats that did develop thyroiditis had lower mRNA levels of Fabp4, perilipin and Slc36a2 but higher mRNA levels of Icam1, Ifitm1 and Slpi than BBdp that did not develop thyroiditis. Excess dietary iodine also increased the protein levels of Fabp4, Cidec and perilipin in BBdp rats.

Conclusion: Differential expression of thyroid genes in BBdp versus BBc rats caused by excess dietary iodine may be implicated in autoimmune thyroiditis and insulitis pathogenesis.

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