Vitamin D concentration and lateral cerebral ventricle volume in older adults

Authors

  • Cédric Annweiler,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Parkwood Hospital, St. Joseph's Health Care London; Gait and Brain Lab, Lawson Health Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
    2. Center for Functional and Metabolic Mapping, Robarts Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
    • Department of Neuroscience, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Angers University Hospital, University Memory Clinic of Angers, UPRES EA 4638, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France
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  • Manuel Montero-Odasso,

    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Parkwood Hospital, St. Joseph's Health Care London; Gait and Brain Lab, Lawson Health Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • Vladimir Hachinski,

    1. Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University Hospital, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • Sudha Seshadri,

    1. Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Framingham, MA, USA
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  • Robert Bartha,

    1. Center for Functional and Metabolic Mapping, Robarts Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • Olivier Beauchet

    1. Department of Neuroscience, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Angers University Hospital, University Memory Clinic of Angers, UPRES EA 4638, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France
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Correspondence: Dr. Cédric Annweiler, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Angers University Hospital, 49933 Angers Cedex 9, France

E-mail: CeAnnweiler@chu-angers.fr

Fax: +33-2-41-35-48-94

Abstract

Scope

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an enlargement of the lateral cerebral ventricles in rodents. The effect of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) on lateral cerebral ventricle volume has not been studied yet in humans. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine whether vitamin D deficiency was associated with greater lateral cerebral ventricle volume in older adults.

Methods and results

Ninety-two Caucasian community-dwellers with no clinical hydrocephalus (mean, 72.2 ± 6.2 years; 46.7% female) were divided into two groups according to serum 25OHD concentration (deficiency ≤ 50 nmol/L; normal > 50 nmol/L). Cerebral ventricular volume was quantified using semi-automated software from three-dimensional T1-weighted MRI. Age, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, education level, Mini-Mental State Examination, white matter lesions, and serum calcium concentrations were used as covariates. There was an inverse linear association between 25OHD concentration and ventricular volume (p = 0.049). Compared to individuals with normal 25OHD, those with 25OHD deficiency (n = 33) had 28% larger lateral ventricles (46.9 ± 26.8 mL versus 36.6 ± 16.4 mL, p = 0.026). Vitamin D deficiency was associated with an increase in ventricular volume (adjustedβ = 16.55, p = 0.023). The ventricular enlargement involved ventricle bodies (p = 0.025) but not temporal horns (p = 0.112).

Conclusion

Serum 25OHD deficiency was associated with larger lateral cerebral ventricles. These findings provide a scientific base for vitamin D replacement trials.

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