SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • Adipocyte;
  • Endogenous antioxidant defence;
  • Insulin resistance;
  • Lipolysis;
  • Oxidative stress

Scope

Obesity-related metabolic syndrome is often associated with a decrease of insulin sensitivity, inducing several modifications. However, dietary antioxidants could prevent insulin resistance. We have previously shown the preventive effects of a melon superoxide dismutase (SOD) in obese hamsters. However, its antioxidant effects have never been studied on adipose tissue.

Methods and results

We evaluated the effects of a 1-month curative supplementation with SODB on the adipose tissue of obese hamsters. Animals received either a standard diet or a cafeteria diet for 15 wk. Cafeteria diet induced obesity and related disorders, including insulin resistance and oxidative stress, in the abdominal adipose tissue. After SODB supplementation, the adipose tissue weight was decreased, probably by activating adipocytes lipolysis and thus reducing their size. SODB treatment also resulted in abdominal adipose tissue fibrosis reduction. Finally, SODB administration increased the expression of endogenous antioxidant enzymes and thus reduced oxidative stress and insulin resistance. The improvement of insulin sensitivity observed after SODB treatment could explain adipocyte lipolysis activation and fibrosis reduction.

Conclusion

These findings demonstrate that a dietary SOD supplementation could be a useful strategy against obesity-related modifications in adipose tissue.