Dietary α-mangostin, a xanthone from mangosteen fruit, exacerbates experimental colitis and promotes dysbiosis in mice

Authors

  • Fabiola Gutierrez-Orozco,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Human Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Food Innovation Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    • Correspondence: Dr. Fabiola Gutierrez-Orozco, Department of Human Sciences, The Ohio State University, 1787 Neil Avenue, 325 Campbell Hall, Columbus, OH 43210 USA

      E-mail: gutierrez-orozco.1@osu.edu

      Fax: +1-614-292-4339

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  • Jennifer M. Thomas-Ahner,

    1. Food Innovation Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Lisa D. Berman-Booty,

    1. Division of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Cancer Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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  • Jeffrey D. Galley,

    1. Food Innovation Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Chureeporn Chitchumroonchokchai,

    1. Department of Human Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Food Innovation Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Thomas Mace,

    1. Food Innovation Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Sunit Suksamrarn,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok, Thailand
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  • Michael T. Bailey,

    1. Food Innovation Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Steven K. Clinton,

    1. Food Innovation Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    3. Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Gregory B. Lesinski,

    1. Food Innovation Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Mark L. Failla

    1. Department of Human Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Food Innovation Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    3. Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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Abstract

Scope

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon. α-Mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, exerts anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities in vitro. We evaluated the impact of dietary α-MG on murine experimental colitis and on the gut microbiota of healthy mice.

Methods and results

Colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Mice were fed control diet or diet with α-MG (0.1%). α-MG exacerbated the pathology of DSS-induced colitis. Mice fed diet with α-MG had greater colonic inflammation and injury, as well as greater infiltration of CD3+ and F4/80+ cells, and colonic myeloperoxidase, than controls. Serum levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, IL-6, and serum amyloid A were also greater in α-MG-fed animals than in controls. The colonic and cecal microbiota of healthy mice fed α-MG but no DSS shifted to an increased abundance of Proteobacteria and decreased abundance of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, a profile similar to that found in human UC.

Conclusion

α-MG exacerbated colonic pathology during DSS-induced colitis. These effects may be associated with an induction of intestinal dysbiosis by α-MG. Our results suggest that the use of α-MG-containing supplements by patients with UC may have unintentional risk.

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