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New shrimp IgE-binding proteins involved in mite-seafood cross-reactivity

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Abstract

Scope

Shrimp is a seafood consumed worldwide and the main cause of severe allergenic reactions to crustaceans. Seafood allergy has been related to mite sensitization, mainly mediated by tropomyosin, but other proteins could be involved. The aim of the study was to identify new shrimp allergens implicated in mite-seafood cross-reactivity (CR) in two different climate populations: dry and humid climates.

Methods and results

Shrimp and mite IgE-binding profiles of patients from continental dry and humid climates were analyzed by immunoblotting, and the most frequently recognized Solenocera melantho shrimp proteins were identified by MS as α-actinin, β-actin, fructose biphosphate aldolase, arginine kinase, sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein, and ubiquitin. Using inhibition immunoblot assays, we demonstrate that tropomyosin and ubiquitin were responsible for mite-seafood CR from both climates; but also α-actinin and arginine kinase are implicated in dry- and humid-climate populations, respectively. Reciprocal inhibition assays demonstrated that mites are the primary sensitizer in humid-climate, as shrimp is in continental dry-climate population.

Conclusion

Several new shrimp allergens have been identified and should be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of shrimp allergy and mite-seafood CR. Differences in mite-seafood CR were founded to be based on the climate.

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