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Keywords:

  • Wilms tumors;
  • pathology;
  • anaplasia;
  • p53;
  • prognosis

Abstract

Background

Mutations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 are commonly found in several kinds of human cancer. In some types of neoplasms, accumulation of p53 protein has been reported to correlate with more aggressive clinical behavior. The role of p53 expression in Wilms tumors (WT) is not clear yet, but most studies have confirmed its correlation with anaplasia and advanced stage disease.

Procedure

Ninety-seven WT were evaluated for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed parafin-embedded tissue and correlated with outcome. Tumors were classified as p53-Negative (p53-N) when no positivity was observed or only few cells showed weak positivity (0/1+) and p53-Positive (p53-P) when there was a diffuse and strong nuclear positivity (2+/3+).

Results

p53-P was detected in 13 out of 97 tumors and was associated with disease relapse (39 vs.17%; P = 0.06) but not with anaplasia. Among p53-N patients only 5% had metastatic disease compared with 31% of the p53-P sample. (P = 0.038). Overall survival was 94% for patients with p53-N vs. 85% for patients with p53-P at 1 year (P = 0.34).

Conclusions

p53 expression in Wilms tumor detected by immunohistochemistry seems to be associated with advanced disease and relapse. Med Pediatr Oncol 2001;37:455–458. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.