Effect of total parenteral nutrition on marrow recovery during induction therapy for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in childhood

Authors

  • Daniel M. Hays MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Divisions of Oncology/Hematology and Gastroenterology/Nutrition, the Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles and the School of Medicine, University of Southern California
    • Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90027
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  • Russell J. Merritt MD,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Divisions of Oncology/Hematology and Gastroenterology/Nutrition, the Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles and the School of Medicine, University of Southern California
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  • Leslie White MB, FRACP,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Divisions of Oncology/Hematology and Gastroenterology/Nutrition, the Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles and the School of Medicine, University of Southern California
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  • Judith Ashley MSPH, RD,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Divisions of Oncology/Hematology and Gastroenterology/Nutrition, the Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles and the School of Medicine, University of Southern California
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  • Stuart E. Siegel MD

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Divisions of Oncology/Hematology and Gastroenterology/Nutrition, the Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles and the School of Medicine, University of Southern California
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Abstract

Ten well-nourished children with acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) were randomly assigned to groups that received (a) total parenteral nutrition (TPN) throughout the period of induction therapy or (b) standard nutritional support. Body mass and skin hypersensitivity reactions were better maintained in experimental patients. Patients on TPN had higher total white blood counts, absolute granulocyte counts, and platelet counts than did control patients during the course. No difference was apparent in the frequency of febrile episodes, or other aspects of the patients' courses. This preliminary report suggests that intensive nutritional support may accelerate the recovery of normal marrow function during induction therapy for ANLL.

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