Macromolecular Reaction Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 11

Special Issue: Science and Technology of Bio-Inspired Adhesives

November 2013

Volume 7, Issue 11

Pages 565–660

Issue edited by: Hadi Izadi, Alexander Penlidis

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Macromol. React. Eng. 11/2013 (page 565)

      Yong Zhao, Boya Zhang, Ning Yan and Ramin. R. Farnood

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201370033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Front Cover: Bio-based PF novolac resins are formulated using acid-catalyzed phenol liquefied bark from mountain pine beetle infested lodgepole pine (MPB). The properties of liquefied bark and liquefied bark-PF novolac resins are investigated. The liquefied MPB barks are suitable for partially substituting the petroleum-based phenol to formulate PF novolac resins. Further details can be found in the article by Y. Zhao, B. Zhang, N. Yan,* R. R. Farnood on page 646.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Macromol. React. Eng. 11/2013 (page 662)

      Hadi Izadi and Alexander Penlidis

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201370036

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: Due to their non-conductive matrix, insulating polymers are becoming naturally charged at the surface upon contact with other materials (or themselves). Considering typical large charge densities that polymers develop in this way, it is expected that gecko-inspired adhesives made from such polymers experience significant electrostatic interactions upon contact, a fact which has not been accounted for in detail so far. Further details can be found in the article by H. Izadi, A. Penlidis* on page 588.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. React. Eng. 11/2013 (page 566)

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201370034

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Macromol. React. Eng. 11/2013 (page 567)

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201370035

  5. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Science and Technology of Bio-Inspired Adhesives (pages 570–572)

      Hadi Izadi and Alexander Penlidis

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201300182

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Full Papers
    1. Bioadhesives: A Review (pages 573–587)

      Samaneh Khanlari and Marc A. Dubé

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201300114

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent trends in bioadhesive production reveal many applications such as tissue adhesives and in drug delivery. Innovations for the use of nanomaterials in bioadhesives and the development of stimuli-responsive drug delivery enable targeting of specific organs with specific drugs.

    2. Polymeric Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives: Van der Waals or Electrostatic Interactions? (pages 588–608)

      Hadi Izadi and Alexander Penlidis

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201300146

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bio-inspired dry adhesives are traditionally designed and analyzed according to their efficiency in generating effective van der Waals (vdW) interactions upon contact. In this review, it is demonstrated that in addition to vdW forces, electrostatic forces generated through surface charging contribute significantly to the adhesion performance of dry adhesives, a fact which has not been given detailed consideration as of yet.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Full Papers
    1. The Mechanisms of Detachment of Mushroom-Shaped Micro-Pillars: From Defect Propagation to Membrane Peeling (pages 609–615)

      Luciano Afferrante and Giuseppe Carbone

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201300125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The detachment of a mushroom-shaped micro-pillar takes place as a consequence of destabilization and crack-like propagation of interfacial voids. When the radius of the crack exceeds the pillar radius, bending of the plate governs the process. This causes a significant reduction of pull-off force. However, as the crack radius is increased further, detachment resembles the peeling of an axisymmetric membrane, leading to a linear increase of the strength of adhesion with crack radius.

    2. Enhanced Shear Adhesion by Mechanical Interlocking of Dual-Scaled Elastomeric Micropillars With Embedded Silica Particles (pages 616–623)

      Yudi Rahmawan, Seong Min Kang, Su Yeon Lee, Kahp-Yang Suh and Shu Yang

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201300149

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dual-scale micropillars embedded with silica particles show a significant enhancement of shear adhesion strength by an order of magnitude relative to pristine micropillars. A mathematical model based on interwoven cylinders indicates that repetitive protrusions on the head of micropillars provide a more robust interlocking between the micropillars.

    3. Dispersion of Silver Nanoparticles into Polymer Matrix Dry Adhesives to Achieve Antibacterial Properties, Increased Adhesion, and Optical Absorption (pages 624–631)

      Enrico Bovero, Kaylee E. A. Magee, Edgar C. Young and Carlo Menon

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201300110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A one-step fabrication method is developed for the homogenous dispersion of Ag nanoparticles in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Microstructured dry adhesives treated with these Ag nanoparticles show antibacterial properties, increased adhesion, and optical absorption.

    4. Characterization of Dry Adhesives Fabricated Using a Novel Mass Production Manufacturing Technique (pages 632–637)

      Jeffrey Krahn and Carlo Menon

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201300111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dry adhesives have been manufactured from commercially available mesh using a novel technique. Four different meshes are used to fabricate dry adhesives and their normal adhesion pressure is measured and found to have an increased adhesion pressure when compared to flat PDMS.

    5. Measuring Shear-Induced Adhesion of Gecko-Inspired Fibrillar Arrays Using Scanning Probe Techniques (pages 638–645)

      Yasong Li, Cheng Zhang, James H.-W. Zhou, Carlo Menon and Byron D. Gates

      Version of Record online: 30 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201300113

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Adhesion forces are measured for an array of nanometer-scale fibrils using normal and shear-induced contact by means of a scanning probe microscope manipulated cantilever. Hundreds of measurements are obtained with control over directions, distances, and rates of the cantilever movements. This method could provide further insight into nanometer-scale structure–function relationships for artificial dry adhesives.

    6. Synthesis and Characterization of Phenol Formaldehyde Novolac Resin Derived from Liquefied Mountain Pine Beetle Infested Lodgepole Pine Barks (pages 646–660)

      Yong Zhao, Boya Zhang, Ning Yan and Ramin. R. Farnood

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mren.201300112

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study, mountain pine beetle infested lodgepole pine barks are liquefied in phenol and the properties of the liquefied bark, and liquefied bark-novolac resins are investigated. The liquefied bark-novolac resins reveal higher molecular weights, higher curing activation energies, faster curing rates, and higher pre-cure thermal stabilities than the lab-made control novolac resin without bark components. These findings suggest that the liquefied barks from beetle-infested lodgepole pines are suitable for partially substituting the petroleum-based phenol to synthesize phenol-formaldehyde novolac resins.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION