Detection of amyloid plaques in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease by magnetic resonance imaging

Authors

  • Jiangyang Zhang,

    1. Department of Radiology, Division of NMR Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
    2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Paul Yarowsky,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Marcia N. Gordon,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida
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  • Giovanni Di Carlo,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Sanjay Munireddy,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Peter C.M. van Zijl,

    1. Department of Radiology, Division of NMR Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
    2. F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Susumu Mori

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Radiology, Division of NMR Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
    2. F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, Maryland
    • Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 217 Traylor Bldg., 720 Rutland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21205
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Abstract

We performed three-dimensional, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of fixed mouse brains to determine whether MRI can detect amyloid plaques in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Plaque-like structures in the cortex and hippocampus could be clearly identified in T2-weighted images with an image resolution of 46 μm × 72 μm × 72 μm. The locations of plaques were confirmed in coregistration studies comparing MR images with Congo red-stained histological results. This technique is quantitative, less labor-intensive compared to histology, and is free from artifacts related to sectioning process (deformation and missing tissues). It enabled us to study the distribution of plaques in the entire brain in 3D. The results of this study suggest that this method may be useful for assessing treatment efficacy in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Magn Reson Med 51:452–457, 2004. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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