Prospective head-movement correction for high-resolution MRI using an in-bore optical tracking system

Authors

  • Lei Qin,

    1. Advanced MRI, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    2. Bioengineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA
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  • Peter van Gelderen,

    1. Advanced MRI, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • John Andrew Derbyshire,

    1. Translational Medicine Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Fenghua Jin,

    1. Bioengineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA
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  • Jongho Lee,

    1. Advanced MRI, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Jacco A. de Zwart,

    1. Advanced MRI, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Yang Tao,

    1. Bioengineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA
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  • Jeff H. Duyn

    Corresponding author
    1. Advanced MRI, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    • National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bldg.10, Rm. B1D-723, Bethesda, MD 20892-1065
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Abstract

In MRI of the human brain, subject motion is a major cause of magnetic resonance image quality degradation. To compensate for the effects of head motion during data acquisition, an in-bore optical motion tracking system is proposed. The system comprises two MR-compatible infrared cameras that are fixed on a holder right above and in front of the head coil. The resulting close proximity of the cameras to the object allows precise tracking of its movement. During image acquisition, the MRI scanner uses this tracking information to prospectively compensate for head motion by adjusting the gradient field direction and radio frequency (RF) phases and frequencies. Experiments performed on subjects demonstrate robust system performance with translation and rotation accuracies of 0.1 mm and 0.15°, respectively. Magn Reson Med, 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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