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A 64-channel 3T array coil for accelerated brain MRI

Authors

  • Boris Keil,

    Corresponding author
    1. A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    • A. A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129
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  • James N. Blau,

    1. A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Stephan Biber,

    1. Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany
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  • Philipp Hoecht,

    1. Siemens Medical Solutions, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Veneta Tountcheva,

    1. A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Kawin Setsompop,

    1. A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Christina Triantafyllou,

    1. A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    3. McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Lawrence L. Wald

    1. A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    3. Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
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Abstract

A 64-channel brain array coil was developed and compared to a 32-channel array constructed with the same coil former geometry to precisely isolate the benefit of the 2-fold increase in array coil elements. The constructed coils were developed for a standard clinical 3T MRI scanner and used a contoured head-shaped curved former around the occipital pole and tapered in at the neck to both improve sensitivity and patient comfort. Additionally, the design is a compact, split-former design intended for robust daily use. Signal-to-noise ratio and noise amplification (G-factor) for parallel imaging were quantitatively evaluated in human imaging and compared to a size and shape-matched 32-channel array coil. For unaccelerated imaging, the 64-channel array provided similar signal-to-noise ratio in the brain center to the 32-channel array and 1.3-fold more signal-to-noise ratio in the brain cortex. Reduced noise amplification during highly parallel imaging of the 64-channel array provided the ability to accelerate at approximately one unit higher at a given noise amplification compared to the sized-matched 32-channel array. For example, with a 4-fold acceleration rate, the central brain and cortical signal-to-noise ratio of the 64-channel array was 1.2- and 1.4-fold higher, respectively, compared to the 32-channel array. The characteristics of the coil are demonstrated in accelerated brain imaging. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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